education in haiti The property now housing the Simonette Child Development Center used to be a “peristil,” or Voodoo temple, where a well-known Voodoo priest named Sore ruled for several decades.

Sore was such a famous Voodoo priest that people from different regions in the country came to see him every day for different reasons. Pastor Monas had to face fierce opposition from Sore when he was called by God to start his ministry there 21 years ago.

Just a few months after Pastor Monas began his ministry in that area, Sore, the Voodoo priest, gave his life to Jesus. Many of his followers also turned over their lives to Christ. Before he passed away, Sore dedicated the property to the Lord for the local church and different ministries, including the school.

Currently, Simonette Christian Church is the first partner to benefit from the ministry’s reconstruction program after the 2010 earthquake that destroyed the inadequate school infrastructure that existed.

Pastor Monas shares,

“I give thanks to God that among the 44 projects that were destroyed by the earthquake, Simonette is the first one that benefits from the reconstruction. I have been facing big challenges in my ministry here during the last 21 years, but I can now testify that our partnership with Compassion (10 years) has opened the door to long-term development for our community.”

Before Pastor Monas’ ministries started in Simonette, none of the children in that area had the chance to reach the seventh grade. The reason for that was the location of existing schools. It took some children three hours to walk to the nearest town for school.

The Simonette school has made a great difference in the community as it allows more than 300 children, 280 of them sponsored, to benefit from the best education.

“Before I started my ministry in Simonette, the whole community was under the domination of Satan. As a result, many children died before reaching grade six. Because of the gospel, the devil has now no power over the children and their parents.”

Parents and children were brokenhearted when the earthquake destroyed the only school in the community. This new construction with 12 classrooms and other infrastructure brings hope again, as it will allow more children to benefit from a better education.

Ricardy is an orphan who became sponsored at 5 years old. Now, at age 15, he is in grade nine and has big dreams for the future because of our ministry’s help. Ricardy tells us,

“I like Compassion very much because were it not for its assistance, I would never been able to go to school since I have no mother and no father.

“I like my school because it is near my house. During recess time, I go to my house, eat a little something, and come back to class. If it was far away from my home, my grandmother would not be able to find transportation money to send me.

“After the earthquake, we were gathering under a tent for class. Right now I am proud of my school because it is the most beautiful school in the whole community.”

Pastor Monas is proud to see that his vision is being accomplished through the years. The reputation of the church is increasing every day because of the quality of our program. The academic performance of sponsored children is higher than the national average.

In the latest statistics, our students ranked an average of 74% in the grade 12 final exams compared with the 50% country average, and 86.11% in grade 13 final exams compared with the 86% country average.

Pastor Monas ultimate’s goal is to see that all of the children from his community have the chance to attend school and become accomplished adults. He also would like to see the whole Simonette population turn their lives to Jesus before he passes away.

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  1. Jan 31, 2012
    at 10:17 am

    What a great story. I have seen the influence of voodoo/witch doctors first hand when I served in Africa for 2 years as a missionary. They have so much influence on the community. It is great to see one come to know the true Savior and help bring others to Him.

  2. george knoop
    Jan 31, 2012
    at 12:39 pm

    I live in PAP am new here (15 mon.) and just statring to see
    the power voodo has over these dear people

  3. Barry
    Jan 31, 2012
    at 6:19 pm

    Amazing story. I have visited this school and church.

  4. Jan 31, 2012
    at 7:17 pm

    More good news out of Haiti! God continues to answer the many prayers over the years for these beautiful people.
    Thanks for sharing Ephraim :)

  5. Nancy Young
    Feb 2, 2012
    at 1:25 pm

    I also visited this Child Development Center. Are they rebuilding where the building that fell originally stood? It is inspiring to think that such good is taking place where Voodoo would have been.

  6. Sheila
    Sep 8, 2012
    at 3:59 pm

    Hello, I am looking for someone to help me with some information regarding Haitian dress. I visited Haiti in the last 70’s and recall that women do dress very modestly if they have apparel. I am involved with making little sun dresses to send to Haiti when our missionary comes in next time.

    My concern is that the little girls may not be allowed to wear them to church since they are sleeveless. Is this still the dress norm for them?

    We want to make them clothing they can wear any day they need it. Thank you for your help or if another person knows, please let me know. May God bless you all. sheila <

    • Nancy
      Sep 8, 2012
      at 6:56 pm

      Sheila, I have only been to Haiti once, so that by no means makes me an expert. I do share your thoughts that Haitians dress more modestly than women in the USA which is good. I remember our Missionaries there telling me that most women prefer not to bare their arms or wear tank tops. When we were there in November the kids at 2 of the centers wore uniforms with sleeves. At the 3rd center it was really a day off for them, but most of them wore dresses or tops with sleeves. In reviewing my pictures of that center I did see one little girl of the age of 5 or so with a sleeveless dress, but not a dress with straps like a “sun dress”. I hope you get more responses, as this was just my experience which was very limited. What a great project, though. Who is it connected with?

    • Jacquie Parella
      Sep 9, 2012
      at 7:17 pm

      Too, I’m checking to see if I can get an answer for you from our field office. Stay tuned….

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