Traditions of Ghana: Warrior King

Until its independence, Ghana was known as the Gold Coast. It was renamed Ghana, meaning “Warrior King,” to reflect the ancient Ghana Empire that flourished in West Africa during the 10th century.

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What Children Really Want to Hear From Their Sponsors

Even sponsors who have been writing for years still ask, “What should I write about?” Well, instead of us giving you ideas of what to write this month for the Second Friday Letter-Writing Club, we decided to share from a trusted source what children really want to hear from their sponsors.

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Drought in Ethiopia: A Déjà vu Famine?

Despite significant economic growth over the past decade, Ethiopia still remains one of the world’s poorest countries and is yet again threatened with food insecurity in different parts of the country due to El Niño. Beyond food relief – a noble act in itself since a hungry child does not know the word ‘tomorrow’ – what must we do today to ensure that that there is food tomorrow?

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How Does the Church Offer Hope for Children in Poverty?

The challenges a church faces when serving a poverty stricken community can appear insurmountable. However, when the will of that community is to have a better future, children have the opportunity to accomplish great things.

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Poverty Tourism vs. Pilgrimage

In its worst expression, poverty tourism is not just the exploitation of one group — the poor — it is the exploitation of two groups, those visited and those visiting.

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African Childhood: Beauty in Simplicity

For the International Day of the African Child, take a photo journey into what African childhood can look like. One filled with the beauty of simplicity.

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Water Isn’t All Africa Needs

When providing clean water to communities in Africa, the conversation can’t stop there. Sanitation education is crucial to sustainable health care.

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How to Save a Life With an Egg

When one of the children or youth enrolled in our program has a medical crisis, the Compassion staff and church partners in that country will do whatever they can to help. But what about a child who isn’t enrolled in our program?

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World Malaria Day: Save a Family Through Malaria Prevention

Instead of showing up to the playground for his morning soccer game, little Mamadou woke with a high fever and began to vomit. His mother, Mariam, rushed him to the doctor. Sitting on the back of the bicycle, clutching his mother’s dress tightly, Mamadou quivered throughout the 10km-long ride from their house to the public health center. His mother had only one thought: She hoped her son did not have malaria.

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TV Takes Easter Beyond Church Walls in Burkina Faso

A children’s TV program provides a means for staff member Phoebe Lankoande to share the message of Easter beyond the walls of the church in Burkina Faso.

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A New Rite of Passage

Jennifer Sekeyian Kisurkat was consumed by the song and dance of young Maasai dancers during the ceremony of a new type of rite of passage in her community. She felt “excited and privileged” to be part of the wave of change that the Najile School for Girls would bring to her life and the community.

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A Short Guide to Talking About Africa

As a U.S. citizen, I’ve heard many reactions to my nationality as I travel to other places. A few gems: “We love Americans!” “We hate Americans!” “You can print your own money at an ATM.” “You’re all fat.” People have ample opportunities to see the United States in news and entertainment, so they have ample opportunities to form opinions of us — for better or for worse.

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