Life in Shinyanga, the Cattle Capital of Tanzania

The church in Shinyanga has not been very strong for the past several decades because of the mobile nature of people. People have being practicing traditional religions.

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Life in Mwanza, Tanzania — on the Shore of Lake Victoria

Fishing in Lake Victoria has a long, historic background. However, the introduction of Nile perch to the Lake has changed both the social and economic nature of the sector.

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Life in Rural Nicaragua

The roads are muddy with many puddles during the rainy season. During the summer it is very dry and dusty. Plantations are on each side of the road and a few houses here and there. People move on bikes, motorcycles, or horses, except for the very few who have a vehicle. Because of the climate changes, crops were lost and people need to find other ways to survive.

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Life in Arusha, Tanzania — Land of the Maasai

Due to its geopolitical position, Arusha is attracting more people and growing quickly, which has caused an increase in the crime rate. It is well connected by tarmac roads to the major cities of Nairobi and Dar es Salaam. These cities have a direct influence on what happens in Arusha.

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Life in Urban Nicaragua

Managua’s economy is based mainly on trade. It has suffered two devastating earthquakes over the course of the 20th century — in 1931 and again in 1972 — that destroyed the center of the city, which has not been rebuilt. Managua is the economic, political, cultural, commercial and industrial center of Nicaragua.

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Rural Life in the Philippines

Due to poverty, many children drop out of school to work in sugarcane plantations. Here, they are exploited and forced to work long hours for meager pay. Negros Occidental has the highest magnitude of poor families in the country, mostly concentrated in rural areas. About 33 percent of the population lives on less than $1 a day.

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Urban Life in the Philippines

Metro Manila, seen as a “land of opportunities,” has lured many people from different provinces to work and live here. About 35 percent of the families live in informal slum areas that are unfit for settlement, such as in low-lying flood plains, on riverbanks, near highways and railroads, and on dumpsites.

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Life in El Salvador

El Salvador is the smallest country in Central America. Located between Guatemala and Honduras, it possesses 21,041 square kilometers (about the size of Massachusetts) and is tropical, with an average temperature of 30° to 35°C (80°to 95°F). The land is mostly mountains covered with tropical rainforest, with its highest peak being El Pital at 8,957 feet.

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Life in Burkina Faso

Burkina Faso — translated as “country of upright people” — is one of the poorest countries in the world (172 of 182 countries, according to the United Nations Development Programme).

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Life in the Southwestern Region of the Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic is divided into 31 provinces; nine are in the southwestern region of the country: San Cristóbal, San José de Ocoa, Azua, San Juan, Elias Piña, Barahona, Baoruco, Independencia and Pedernales.

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