30 Stunning Pictures of Bedrooms in the Developing World

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  1. Kathy Tollenaere September 16, 2016

    Thank you! This was a beautiful documentary.

  2. Donfer August 25, 2016

    Wow. That gives me a compassionate eye to see beyond the poverty which seems to surround the people in third world countries.

  3. Ruth Weaver July 30, 2016

    Thank you for sharing these pictures; it gives us a better idea of their circumstances. It also reminds me to be thankful and content for what I have. I wish I could sponsor many more children in need but am grateful for what I can do.

  4. Norma July 4, 2016

    Awesome pictures. They really give a true perspective of life in other countries causing me to have a grateful heart for all my blessings.
    Thank you for sharing,
    Norma

  5. Neil Hickey June 21, 2016

    After reading different comments -all of which were fine and informative)I would like to say this .So we just saw 30 children/people allowing us to see them in their bedrooms and in so doing we get a glimpse into their lives -maybe their economic condition -probably in almost all cases the people looking a the pictures are doing better than the ones in the ictures and this can bring up all kinds of socialjustice equality issues which is a huge issue no doubt but for me at least it doesnt have to be too complicated -there doesnt have to be guilt about being “priveleged” etc etc-IF we just do what we can-and if we do what we can theres no need to feel guilty about having whatever -a car a job a nice house -after all we didnt make the world -we didnt make the person poor -even if you want to indict the West -america or whoever as corporately resposible for poverty it still comes back to the same issue -are we doing what we can-personally I dont think God (normally at least) to say give away all our money -sell our house -our car in the name of justice -that we necessarilyhave to get the radical to satify justice -oh we do have to satisfy justice- but its not necessarily according to a guilt driven .nuerosis driven approach-but heres a word-sacrifice-I think the Lord will ask us to give to those who have less to the point where it requires us to sacrifice,and with that sacrifice will come the sense of Gods blessing which more than pays back whatever inconvenience the giving may have involved.

  6. stephanie June 13, 2016

    I just got a new part-time job. I’ll be starting in a week God-willing and I’m excited to be sponsoring a child once I get my first paycheck. I currently have a little 4 year old and I’m excited to show her the photo of our sponsored child once the photo comes in the mail. Glory be to God forever who is eternally worthy! #excited

    1. Oundo Deogratius August 17, 2016

      Stephanie you cant now how grateful we are when you choose to love these children. You actually love God you love humanity! God bless you and prosper you beyond your expectations.

      Thank you.

    2. Emily Vanhoutan
      Emily Vanhoutan June 13, 2016

      Stephanie, praise God for your new job! We’re so excited for your family and your precious kiddo will be so blessed by you and your child :). Thank you for your sacrifice and for choosing to invest in their life!

  7. eyiz June 7, 2016

    wow,Sometimes I think thing are really bad for me and just seeing the smiles on their faces, I’m touched. I look forward to the day I can afford more than one child. I feel so grateful to be a part of this.

  8. Anusarin Lowe May 20, 2016

    The portrayal of these images comes with the intention of informing that there are many people still living in conditions less desirable in Western standard (as the main audience of this website) and appealing for support to help the developing world lift up their standard of living. Most of the ‘bedrooms’ are just walls with no windows, some with very flimsy walls and roofs, offering minimal protection from the elements. When comparing this to the opposite end where a wealthy person’s house could be gated, monitored by CCTV cameras, heating/cooling/lighting/ambience computerised-controlled, equipped with all sorts of appliances and gadgets and also the vertical development/competition to be live as farther up as possible (almost reaching a kilometre in height http://www.burjkhalifa.ae/en/index.aspx), it is clear that it all comes down to inequality that is one huge problem in the world.

    I agree with one of the comment posters about living modestly (and moderately) and that is something I aspire to. The ‘standard’ created based on the Western values can be viewed as having much detrimental impact to the environment. I often think about how wild animals live and how little/no negative impact they cause to the world compared to us. We quarry and sometimes wipe out mountains to bring stones to build accommodation, we bore holes into the earth to bring up metal through massive mining operations to construct buildings, make machines that will wash our clothes, etc, then dig up coal to use to heat the house, cut down forests to make furniture to make beds, chairs, wardrobe (because we like to accumulate clothes), kitchen cabinets (because we like to accumulate foodstuff and kitchen gadgets), etc. Then we look for the best job we can get which might not be commutable on foot so we buy cars which we can also use for pleasure to go somewhere nice at the weekends. We use animals to test new treatments in the name of medical advancement because we want to be able to overcome illnesses.

    Having said all that, I still would like people to be able to afford to live in a hygienic, safe and secure condition. Using these images might be a tool to raise people’s awareness and to appeal for support but I would like this to be done with caution. These people deserve respect too. I would not like photographers coming in to my home photographing it without tidying up first, let alone if it had no windows, no proper floor or a leaking roof.

    My personal experience is that the living conditions I grew up in are not what I aspire for my own children. My parents rented, we lived on the ground floor with the landlord living above. The front was the shop, with the back being the living quarter, no living or dining room, corrugated iron, etc. Thankfully, the conditions improved as my parents started to do better economically. At the time I didn’t feel particularly deprived but there were basic things I longed to have such as having my own room, bookshelves, having a living room so I could sit down to read books quiety away from the hustle and bustle of the shop. As a parent, I feel lucky I can provide all these to my child and would like other parents to be able to as well.

  9. Nicole Caraccilo May 9, 2016

    I believe we were ment to live like these people, very modest, the world is not our home our home is with Christ in heaven, Cains line was the first to build cities for men, the others were tent dwellers. Cain was comfortable here;we should not live like this is our final home, so really it is with our brothers and sisters in these poverty stricken areas of the world where”blessed are the poor. blessed are those who mourn” really ring true. The kindom of heaven is theirs for they have not made the earth their abode [PLEASE READ the following:]
    “The appearance of the first city [after the flood, built by Nimrod] goes back in the story of Cain and Abel, when Cain went out and built a city. It illustrated the hunger of humanity to huddle together for companionship, even though they were not really ready to do it (as they still, obviously, are not ready to live together successfully in cities). God’s final intention is to build a city for man. Abraham looked for “a city which has foundations, whose builder and maker is God.” But man was not yet ready for that. Now here they are, again ready to build a city to satisfy the desires of body and soul. There is nothing that does this better than for human beings to live together in cities. Cities are centers of commercial and business life where all the needs of the body can best be met. Also, cities are centers of pleasure and culture, where all the hungers of the soul can be satisfied: hunger for beauty, art, and music and all the ingredients of culture.”

    1. J.Joshua Kono May 17, 2016

      A very good observation. The question is where we have our lives invested and where we have our treasures stored up: down here or up there?
      While the world is trying to rebuild the Tower of Babel, let us build the Kingdom of Heaven.

  10. Jonathan Ambuchi Sila May 5, 2016

    The pictures are beautiful, I have loved them and have learned a lot of what is happening out there. At one time we were sleeping on animal skins as mattress. Now things have changed, people are sleeping on better beddings than before. I am sure that other parts of the world people are still having greater challenges. With time when these problems are addressed life will change.

  11. Melissa May 4, 2016

    These are beautiful. I appreciate the families sharing their homes with us! It! is so special

  12. Rahel May 1, 2016

    when i see those pictures i can’t stop crying because i was one of them ( i was former sponsor child who was struggling so many things but God help me through compassion.God is the reason the way i am today , may God bless you guys specially sponsors and i love you my sponsor children.MA LORD BLESS YOU ALL

    1. J.Joshua Kono May 17, 2016

      Dear Rahel,

      We are taught to be thankful in every situation, whether times are good or evil, because our pains often help us identify ourselves with those who suffer.
      I’m sorry that life was never easy for you and you had to fight to dream your dreams.
      I am an orphan so I know how to identify myself with the orphaned children and likewise, I’m sure you can identify yourself with the less fortunate like you were before.

    2. Cathy Owen May 13, 2016

      Rahel, may you be blessed abundantly! God knows you and he chose you and gifted you for a special destiny in life. His arms of infinite love surround you.
      I sponsor 4 children (plus 3 others who left the program) and this is a special calling on my life.

      1. Geofrey Julius June 8, 2016

        Wow! this is very good the world needs people like you.

  13. Starla Jean April 23, 2016

    I live with and among many people, including myself who guilty of being depressed and complaining of so many things that any one of these children would consider the best thing that they could ever dream of. Shame on all of us!! We all need a reality check!! Take a good look around people, we are all millionaires in contrast to so many millions of others who don’t even have safe water to drink, food to eat, secure roofs over their heads or solid floors under their feet. And so much that we all take for granted!! I am thankful for my life and I would give all my possessions away if just 1 family or even 1 child wouldn’t have to suffer and have the chance to experience even 1 of the joys that we all take for granted everyday. Their the ones who truly deserve it, not I.

    1. Judy Ashley May 2, 2016

      Amen

  14. Boyd A Queen Sr April 22, 2016

    I do not either Natasha. We are the lucky ones. We complain about many things, but for the most part we have clean water, and live in mostly good houses, with electric appliances, and we manage to stay warm in the winter, and cool in the summer, with good beds to sleep in. Sometimes I feel guilty buy the way I live knowing others are in need, but I am not a wealthy person here in America, but wealthy compared to the under developed countries. Wish I could do more.

  15. Mardene Carr April 20, 2016

    And to think sometimes we complain even when we cannot figure out which room to sleep in

  16. Keturah_D April 18, 2016

    These photos say so much! There are many very nice bedrooms around the world. The true beauty is the people in the rooms. I ask you to pray for the people who opened their private lives to us. Great idea!

  17. Andrew Ziem April 8, 2016

    This article reminds me of a book I read: Where Children Sleep by James Mollison.

  18. Jeb April 1, 2016

    Wonderful stories and photos. It really shines the light on the living conditions and daily struggles of these kids. I pray that they find the strength to fight poverty and find a life beyond these homes.

    We also sponsor a child from Children International and they featured a story similar to this one in their newsletter last month. It really showed that these living conditions remains a problem for many of these kids around the world: https://www.children.org/stories/2016/feb/where-children-dream

    Great work and God bless.

    1. Eryn Carman April 13, 2016

      Thanks for sharing the Children International stories, Jeb! We stand with you in prayer for all of these families and their journeys.

  19. J.Joshua Kono March 22, 2016

    I’ve lived in Colombia, South America, for a while and none of these photos look foreign to me because that’s how I used to live.
    It is true that there are many issues such as electricity shortage (because the guerrillas bomb the power plant every once in a while), problems with pests, lack of clean water and so on.
    Nevertheless, the children are happy and though their houses are far from “mansions”, they have what they can call “homes” and they take a lot of pride in them.
    There they sleep, eat, study, play with their friends, cousins or siblings, talk with their parents about what happened at school, discuss politics(Yes, even at age of 8!), history and share their dreams.
    To these children, their rooms are far more than just bedrooms.
    Back in my “developed” country where I have “everything”, I try to apply to my life what I’ve learned in Colombia: We learn to appreciate, aspire and remain true to our ideals when we are hungry and have nothing.

    1. Eryn Carman April 13, 2016

      Thanks for sharing about your time in Colombia, Joshua. I love that you’ve reminded us that we’re more alike than we are different. What a great perspective!

  20. Natasha March 4, 2016

    Beautiful pictures. They capture the reality far more than any amount of words can. I don’t think many people in first-world nations recognize just how lucky we are compared to some in developing nations.

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