ministry of light Of the thousands of villages in Indonesia, nearly 20 percent remain dark, unreached by electricity. Though sources of energy such as rivers are plentiful and accessible, they remain untouched by technology and have not yet been tapped as electricity sources.

With a university major in electrical engineering, Ronny has a big dream to minister to the poor. He believes that providing electricity is one strategic way to help eradicate poverty in Indonesia.

“I want to help the poor people in Papua villages by providing them hydro-energy technology. They have the resources everywhere; now they need the expertise, technology and people who are willing to go there.”

Ronny considers studying and learning more about hydro energy and other power sources a calling. He has a dream to develop more hydro potential in eastern Indonesia, an area known for its severe poverty, widespread undeveloped areas and lack of human resources.

“When I was going through my transition into the Leadership Development Program, I asked God ‘Why was I here? What was my purpose?’ Surely it wasn’t just to be in the best university in the country. There has to be more to this life than that.”

The Institute of Technology in Bandung (ITB) is among the best technical schools in Indonesia. Only the smartest students are able to enroll. Applicants have to pass a competitive national exam, and the school selects only the best candidates as students. Ronny is the first Leadership Development Program student to enroll in ITB.

Though Ronny’s campus graduates around 15 electrical engineers per year, this number is still low compared with the country’s need for more than 700 electrical engineers every year.

Ronny realizes his country is in an energy crisis. The electricity shortage in Java and Sumatra has confirmed the problem. He hopes he will take part in resolving the energy crisis in his country when he graduates.

“If I wish to change my country, I wish I could be a Minister of Technology and Innovation, who will make a decree and order every university and campus to open their doors for more innovation and research for technology. I would urge them to apply it accordingly to the undeveloped areas in Indonesia.”

Right now Ronny will focus on studying hard and equipping himself with the skills and knowledge needed for the future.

Ronny will graduate in two years. He will then embark on a journey to fulfill his dream of shedding light on Indonesia’s electricity crisis.

“The good part about being in the Leadership Development Program is being able to help people. The hard part is every day you have to keep your focus and realize that you are in constant spiritual battle because that is what God calls me to be in this world — to be God’s minister.”

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  1. Amy Wallace
    Mar 30, 2010
    at 4:56 am

    He’s got big plans and I know God will help him accomplish them all.

  2. Nina
    Mar 30, 2010
    at 8:10 am

    What a super young man. It’s so exciting to hear about these gifted young people who want to give back to their country, to make it a better place. I pray for him to stay focused and to be able to realize his dreams.

  3. Mar 30, 2010
    at 11:37 am

    I’m so proud of Ronny’s perseverance and energy. He is already a leader and a great role model for others behind him. God will do great things through this impressive young man.

  4. Sugeng Widarta
    Mar 30, 2010
    at 9:15 pm

    I know this boy. A litle boy with a big dream. And I know that God have a big plan in his life to his country. Amin

  5. Mar 31, 2010
    at 12:59 am

    When did they start LDP? My child just graduated from the project in Indonesia. Is there a way that she could be chosen as an LDP student?

    • Mar 31, 2010
      at 8:35 am

      Kees,

      The Leadership Development Program began in 1996 in the Philippines. Indonesia began its Leadership Development Program (LDP) in 2005. Indonesia currently has 112 students registered in the program.

      Your child can only be chosen for the Leadership Development Program if she applies, so you should encourage her to do so. Once she does there is a competitive selection process conducted by the country office to choose the students for that year. Typically, the newer countries participating in LDP select 20 students a year, but as the program matures in the country more and more students are able to participate in each class. Uganda recently had a class of 100 students.

  6. Stephanie Green
    Mar 31, 2010
    at 1:35 pm

    Wow, that is great info Chris! Thank you for taking the time to tell us about those details!

  7. Mar 31, 2010
    at 4:37 pm

    I pray and wishing so that there are going to be hundreds or even thousands LDP students like Ronny in Indonesia who have dreams to be the future decision maker in Indonesian country… it’s probably the next 8 to 15 years from now in Sumatera island.

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