Report: Hunger Is on the Rise Around the World

According to a new report, the number of people around the world who are hungry is growing.

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One Meal One Day: Skip a Meal to Feed a Family

If you skip a meal, how can you feed an entire family? Hear how one teenager started a movement at her school to help fight world hunger…and how you can join her.

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One Meal One Day: Survive or Thrive

Children in extreme poverty don’t have the choice to eat walnuts to fight cholesterol, or watermelon to fight cancer, or spinach to fight diabetes. They can’t choose foods to help them thrive. They need basic nourishment to simply SURVIVE.

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Skip a Meal and Change a Child’s World

It is time to stand up for the millions without food, for those who have no voice. It is time to be God’s light and share the hope He brings.

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World Poverty Day: Will You Share the Need?

One billion children world-wide lack basic needs such as food, shelter and clean water. Please share today, World Poverty Day, how blessed we are and how great the need is.

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The Thing About Tummy Rubs

Today is World Food Day. A day to realize how blessed we are just for having a chance to eat a meal and get a full tummy.

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10 Ways T-shirts Make the World a Better Place

I have struggled with trying to figure out how to use the gifts God has given me to do the work God wants me to do, which is is how the seed of making a difference was planted for me and has now sprouted into a company: ResQrags.

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My Sponsor Wiped My Mother’s Tears Away

I celebrate my sponsorship with Compassion because through the relationship with my sponsor, I caught the fire of hope. Sponsorship puts hope in the hearts of children and in return these children serve the rest of the world with that hope.

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Chasing Off the Leopard of Hunger in Uganda

In July 2009, a cry for help went up in parts of northern and eastern Uganda as many people succumbed to the severe and persistent drought that swept across half of the nation. Soroti district was one of the localities that was hardest hit. However, this cry was not new to this part of the country.

Every year Soroti district is listed as a statistic for emergency help. It is said to be one of the districts with the highest levels of poverty in the country, with a very low education level and inhabitants ignorant of cultivation skills. Many have painful memories of war.

With unpredictable weather, from hot and dry conditions that lead to drought and famine, to strong winds and rain that destroy homes and crops, the inhabitants of the land never know what to expect of fickle nature and how to overcome the damage left behind.

To the local inhabitants, the hunger and famine that come with the changing seasons is a leopard looking for the helpless and hopeless to devour. But for a few people in the community, it is time to fight back.

For the beneficiaries of the Asuret and Victory Outreach Orwadai Child Development Centers, it is time to hunt down and chase the “leopard,” and banish it for good.

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H is for Hunger

H is for hunger Here’s a sad bedtime story: One out of seven people in the world go to bed hungry every night, victims of extreme poverty.

You can help them have a happier ending – compassion.com/youcan

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The Ability to Eliminate Extreme Poverty Is Just a Matter of Priorities

The Church’s ability to eliminate extreme poverty is just a matter choosing to do so. We used to say that 40,000 children under age 5 die every day of hunger or preventable diseases. Today, that number is 24,000. These statistics show that in 20 years the number of children who die every day of hunger or preventable diseases has been cut in half. Yet, the birth rate is actually going up. The population is increasing.

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She Is Hungry

She is hungry She didn’t eat yesterday.

The little girl told me that as we sat with her and her mother under a mango tree. The fruit was not ripe yet, and still sat high and green and out of her reach.

Just behind the house, a few rows of corn grew. But they didn’t belong to her family. She could see them every day. But they were out of her reach.

I feel like every week I write about children who “went to bed hungry.” And they did. But right then, I sat before a little girl who literally went to bed less than 24 hours ago with nothing to eat.

I tried to imagine the tiny bit of hunger I’ve felt in my life, magnified. That small ache after missing a meal turned into deep pain after missing one, two, three meals. The slight ache when I take my lunch late turned into a pounding, relentless headache when late turns into never.

I couldn’t imagine it. But this little girl doesn’t have to imagine it. She lives it.

She is hungry when she walks past the market, her pockets empty.

She is hungry when her neighbors light up their braziers at night while her family’s remains cold.

She is hungry while fresh fruits and vegetables are in her sight, but not on her table.

As we left that night, we hauled a bag of rice out of the back of our van. Her mother bowed her head, thanking us over and over. And I knew that when this little girl visited the child development center, she would receive a meal. And that the center workers would watch her carefully, and at the first sign of malnutrition, she would be treated.

Those things are not out of her reach.


Merci

She walked slowly out of her classroom, her face turned towards the ground. Her shoulders hunched up around her ears, the ragged sleeves of her dress nearly reaching her elbows.

“What’s wrong with her?” I asked the group around me. They stopped the girl, and French phrases passed much too quickly for me to keep up. Finally, someone translated for me.

“She can’t pay her school fees, so they’re sending her home.”

That’s when I noticed the headmaster, moving from class to class, a list in his hands. Those were the children who hadn’t paid their fees. He was calling them to the front of their class and asking for the school’s money. And if they didn’t have it, they were sent home.

Read the rest of the entry at I’m Just Sayin’

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