11 Wonderful Reasons to Be Thankful for Kids

This Thanksgiving, we are grateful for all the children who bring joy into our lives … especially the ones we sponsor. Check out these wonderful, silly and adorable reasons to be thankful for the children in your life!

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Top 5 People We’re Grateful For (Hint: One of Them Is You!)

We have a lot to be thankful for here at Compassion. We get to work with amazing kids all around the world. And we also have the best partners in that work! In no particular order, here are the top five people we couldn’t do ministry without!

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Happy Thanksgiving To You and Yours

As we join around the table today with our loved ones, we want to say a sincere THANK YOU to you – for loving your sponsored kids, for having compassion and for being the best advocates for kids in poverty in the world.

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Happy Thanksgiving

On behalf of the children and God we serve, thank you for the abundant love you share with the world. Happy Thanksgiving!

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Pengucapan: Indonesian Thanksgiving

Pengucapan Every year from June until September, the people in Minahasa, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, have celebrated a traditional thanksgiving holiday from generation to generation, called Pengucapan. It is the way the people of Minahasa express their gratitude to God for the blessings of the previous year.

The Pengucapan tradition started when the people in this remote area of Indonesia still worshiped gods. They expressed their gratitude to the ultimate god or the highest god, known as opo wanatas empung walian empung rengan-rengan.

After the harvest, Minahasa people held a kuman kan weru ceremony to eat their harvest for the first time and express their gratitude though song and praise to their gods for fertility, good weather, harvest and health. They would  bring their crops as an offering to their gods.

Christianity came to Minahasa in the 1800s, and Minahasa now has one of the highest rates of Christianity in all of Indonesia.

Pastor Philep, who works with a Compassion child development center in Wiaulapi, explained that after Christianity’s arrival, the Church rejected all forms of worshiping gods as part of animism. But the Church at that time saw the expression of gratitude that Minahasa people had in this tradition and allowed them to continue it through churches.

With the presence of the Church, the form of kuman kan weru changed.

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