david-adhikaryRemember Kamrul, the cycle van driver from Bangladesh you helped buy a cycle van for? Well, David Adhikary is the fine field communication specialist in Bangladesh who reported that story for us. That was one of his first assignments — he just started at Compassion Bangladesh in January. What a nice welcome you gave him!

Now it’s your turn to ask David about his experiences as a Compassion employee, visiting precious sponsored children, and anything else you’re wondering about Bangladesh.

I’ll tell you a bit about him first. He just finished his electrical engineering degree in December of 2007 when he decided that he wanted to serve the Lord by working with Compassion’s ministry. (An engineer and a writer — talented guy!) He loves English and Bengali literature and is a big sports fan too. 
 
cesiah-jairRemember when Chris went to Mexico? He got to meet Cesiah Magaña, who has been working with Compassion Mexico for seven years. She says the seven years have been wonderful — filled with blessings and challenges.

She currently works as the communication specialist, is married and has a precious 2 1/2-year-old son, Jair. She loves driving with her family to the towns around Mexico City, seeing their handicrafts and hearing their stories. 

So it’s time to ask your questions of Cesiah and David. I’ll choose ten questions for each of them to answer. 

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  1. Lindy
    Sep 30, 2008
    at 7:40 am

    David and Cesiah, first of all, thank you so much for all you do for the precious children of Bangladesh and Mexico! My question is, as you go through each day seeing a multitude of needs in these children’s lives, what do you find yourself praying for most often?

  2. Cheryl J
    Sep 30, 2008
    at 8:06 am

    I would like to know the specifics of how the global food crisis is affecting the people in Bangladesh and how it has affected Compassion’s program there? Have you cut back days that the children meet? Has it made a difference in the type of food that you can afford to serve the children?

  3. Sep 30, 2008
    at 9:33 am

    My question is more “curious” in nature: how far do the students travel, on average, to get to the centers and how do they do so? (walk, bus, etc.)

    Thanks for fielding our questions!!

  4. Sep 30, 2008
    at 3:38 pm

    I had the distinct blessing of being in a car with Cesiah and her husband and little boy for about 10 hours when my dad and I visited his sponsored child last February. I asked her all sorts of questions. I can’t think of anything that I haven’t asked her. I can say this though that Cesiah is one of the most gracious, friendly, giving persons on the planet! She and her family were majorly amazing and a huge blessing and her little boy taught me the meaning of the Spanish word for ball: pelota!!!

    Kees

  5. Sep 30, 2008
    at 4:46 pm

    What do you like best about your job?

  6. Mary
    Sep 30, 2008
    at 5:20 pm

    Cesiah and David, what do you love most about the children that you work with?

  7. Sep 30, 2008
    at 7:16 pm

    For both of you – if you could have one wish granted for the children you work with, what would that wish be?

  8. Oct 1, 2008
    at 2:02 pm

    For both of you-If you could tell us (as sponsors) just one thing, what would it be?

    For Cesiah-Sometimes I feel, as a mom of a 3 year old, that I can’t do as much because my daughter is young and requires a lot of time. How do you juggle your time with your 2 1/2 year old son and all the children you encounter daily?

  9. Linda W.
    Oct 15, 2008
    at 4:45 pm

    I am curious what the Bangladesh children think of their American sponsors. I’m sure they are aware of at least some of the news about our conflicts with countries with predominately Muslim populations. Do they have mixed feelings about American sponsors because of that?

  10. Mike Stephens
    Mar 27, 2009
    at 6:52 pm

    Thanks for your work and being a link for us!!!

  11. Kathie D.
    Mar 17, 2012
    at 11:19 am

    A couple of years ago, I called Compassion on a weekend and spoke with a young man with an accent. He told me he was originally from Kenya and was now working here in the states with Compassion. I became more interested in his story than for the reason I called. He told me that by the time Compassion came to his village, he was too old for the program so he did not attend a project. But he told me that he could talk to me for hours about how much Compassion has since changed his entire village. He told me that he left his home to come here to the states but he often goes back to visit them. He said that it is unbelievable how his village has transformed – it is almost unrecognizable to him now. He said that there used to be only a few huts and a couple of chickens – and that was it. Now there are buildings and a church and livestock and better dressed/ better fed people there who are prospering. I would like to hear (and see photos) of the differences that Compassion has made in the villages of Bangladesh too! I now know that many times the villages are effected by even one family’s blessings. And I would love to hear more stories………….

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